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Collaboration: Building Shared Vision in Your Organization

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Teamwork and brainstorming concept with businessmen seated around a table each pointing to cards with colorful sketches of light bulbs conceptual of bright ideas and solutions arranged in a circle.It can sound a little harsh, but it’s true. We live in a “what’s in it for me” society. This mindset is at the core of benefits marketing, where marketers need to be very conscious (and communicative) about what the benefit of their product or service is to their target market. However, what some leaders can overlook is how they can apply benefits marketing concepts inside the organization to create shared vision and, as a result, forward momentum.

Shared vision = shared results.

When a leader can build shared vision and specific benefits around a project goal, the buy in increases productivity, momentum, and passion behind the project. In essence, it gets done easier, faster, and better because people see why the project matters to them.

This was highlighted in one of our recent projects in state government. A grant directive was passed down with a short timeline. Although the grant was provided, no succession plan was in place for this great bit of public health communication that was being developed. What Works Consultants worked with the interested internal stakeholders to determine who needed to be involved. More than that, we researched what mattered to each of these stakeholders to develop benefits-driven shared vision for the project. The result: Everyone sees “whats in it for me” and they are bought into the project.

Are there places in your organization where your projects are stuck? Maybe they don’t move as quickly because they lack shared vision.

Here are some quick tips to develop shared vision and get things flowing.

  1. Have a meeting of the minds: Take the time to sit down and discuss the challenges, aspirations, and goals of the people who you would like buy in from. This will show you “what’s in it for them” in regard to your project.
  2. Assess their position: Will they be involved, kept informed, uninvolved, or perhaps they are a supporter who can provide ideas and open doors?
  3. Enlist in their role: Once you see their role, gain buy in on time commitment and responsibilities. Set process around how they prefer to be communicated to and commit to fulfilling your communication promise.

Building shared vision can lead to great collaboration. Do you need help doing this within your organization? Set an appointment to connect with us!

 

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