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Why are OKRs and KPIs Important?
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The Importance of Communicating Performance Expectations to Employees

As a business leader, it is essential to ensure your employees understand the performance expectations that are set for them. Not doing so can result in confusion, poor performance, loss of morale, and higher turnover. By communicating performance expectations clearly and regularly, you can help your team stay on track and reach goals. Performance metrics, OKRs (Objectives and Key Results), and KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) are all important tools you can use to set and measure employee performance.

What are Performance Metrics?

Performance metrics are used to measure the success of an individual or team in achieving specific goals. They provide a way to track progress over time and identify areas where improvement is needed. OKRs are objectives that are set with measurable key results. They provide a framework for setting goals and tracking progress toward those goals. KPIs are indicators of how well an organization is performing against its objectives. They provide a way to measure the success of an organization’s strategies and initiatives.

Why is it Essential to Communicate Performance Metrics?

By communicating performance expectations to employees, you can help them understand what is expected of them and how they can best contribute to the success of the organization. This helps create a culture of accountability and encourages employees to take ownership of their work. It also helps ensure that everyone is working towards the same goals and that resources are being used efficiently.

Communicating performance expectations also helps build trust between managers and employees. When employees know what is expected of them, they feel more comfortable taking risks and trying new things. This can lead to increased innovation and creativity, which can benefit the entire organization. Additionally, when employees understand their performance expectations, they are more likely to be engaged in their work and motivated to do their best.

Finally, communicating performance expectations helps ensure that everyone is held accountable for their actions. This creates a sense of fairness within the organization as everyone knows what is expected of them and there is no room for ambiguity or confusion about roles or responsibilities.

In Conclusion

It is essential for business leaders to communicate performance expectations to their employees in order to ensure that everyone understands what is expected of them and how they can contribute to the success of the organization. Performance metrics, OKRs, and KPIs are all important tools for setting and measuring employee performance, so it is important for business leaders to use these tools effectively in order to get the most out of their teams.

If you want to get the most out of your teams, an objective third party may be helpful when it comes to developing your OKRs and KPIs. Schedule a complimentary 30-minute consultation to learn more about how What Works Consultants can help. WWC also develops maturity models which can help you develop objective versus subjective performance measures to create more consistent performance metrics within your organization.

Reference

Performance metrics, OKRs, & KPIs [Blog post]. (2020). Retrieved from https://www.business2community.com/strategy/performance-metrics-okrs-kpis-03144890

How CEOs Can Leverage OKRs and KPIs for Superior Performance Management
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From the corner office to the point of service, performance management is a key factor in determining an organization’s success. As a CEO, you need to ensure everyone in your organization is focused on the right objectives and delivering results. To do this, you must understand how to leverage OKRs (Objectives and Key Results) and KPIs (Key Performance Indicators).

By linking the KPIs of each role within the organization to specific organizational OKRs, you can deliver superior performance management by better-monitoring success metrics. In this article, we’ll look at how CEOs can use OKRs and KPIs to enhance performance throughout their organizations.

The Basics: What are OKR and KPI?

The acronym OKR stands for “Objectives and Key Results.” It is a system used to set, track, and measure goals within an organization. In this system, objectives are high-level goals that define the purpose of your team or project. These objectives can be strategic, operational, tactical, or anything else related to the specific area you are measuring. Once you have established your objectives, you define key results which are measurable indicators that signify progress toward achieving the goal. When these key results are met, it means that the objective has been achieved.

KPIs are “Key Performance Indicators” which measure progress towards objectives in an organization. They provide insight into performance by tracking certain metrics such as customer satisfaction ratings or sales figures over time. KPIs help organizations gauge how well they are doing in terms of meeting their goals. By tracking KPIs regularly, executives can identify areas where changes need to be made in order for their teams to reach their desired performance levels.

How To: Establish Objectives & Key Results (OKRs)

Setting OKRs starts with understanding the objectives your organization wants to achieve. If you have already completed a strategic plan, your organizational objectives are documented there. If not, you will need to think strategically about what a successful organization looks like to you. This will help you align with the key results (metrics) you need to see across the organization. These metrics are often measured quarterly and become the benchmarks of organizational performance. Boards LOVE a CEO who knows what performance looks like and how to measure their progress to get there.

Activate Your OKRs: The Power of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

For every OKR set within an organization, there should be a corresponding KPI associated with it in order to track progress over time. This helps executives, middle, and front-line management better understand if their teams are reaching their desired outcomes or if certain strategies need tweaking along the way in order for them to meet their overall objectives. When leaders communicate role expectations using KPIs, it provides a framework that gives employees more clarity. This helps them understand how their daily tasks contribute to organizational success as a whole, a proven way to boost morale across all departments within a business.

Tracking Metrics: Tying It All Together

By combining OKRs and KPIs with thoughtful management strategies and quarterly measurement of success metrics, CEOs can create an effective framework that will not only increase productivity but also motivate employees at all levels of the organization Furthermore, with clear objectives linked directly back to measurable outcomes, performance management becomes much easier. Executives have an easier time identifying both successes and areas for improvement. This aids them in making timely decisions geared toward the achievement of bottom-line results. With this combination, CEOs can ensure sustainable success throughout their entire organization

How to Get Started

Performance management requires strategic planning and thoughtful execution in order for it to be successful. Understandably many executives may feel overwhelmed when first implementing such systems. That’s where What Works Consultants comes in. Our OKR/KPI service extracts OKRs from your strategic plan and executives. We help you identify success metrics, build a system for tracking them and work with your CHRO or COO to communicate aligned KPIs to the field level. Schedule a complimentary Discovery Session now to learn more.

Uncovering the Secret to Employee Retention and Satisfaction in High Turnover Industries
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Employee retention and satisfaction are closely linked issues. This is particularly true in industries with high turnover, as they often struggle to keep up with the demands of a highly competitive job market. Especially in these industries (hospitality, restaurant, and construction especially), employee retention and engagement strategies can be difficult to implement. But research shows that certain key metrics can be used to improve employee satisfaction and higher levels of employee retention. In this article, we’ll take a closer look at these metrics and explain how they can be used to create long-term employee engagement and satisfaction in any industry.

Metric #1: Positive Work Environment

When you cultivate a positive work environment, you intentionally create a workplace where employees feel valued, supported, and respected. It also involves setting clear expectations, providing feedback and recognition when employees go above and beyond, and offering rewards for good performance. All of these actions can help to foster an atmosphere of trust and respect amongst employees, which will in turn lead to increased levels of motivation and job satisfaction.

How to measure: Employee engagement surveys conducted on an annual basis can measure positive work environments and provide insights that drive continuous improvement.

Metric #2: Competitive Salaries and Benefits Packages

Competitive compensation is especially important in industries with high turnover rates as it helps to attract and retain the best talent available. Employers should ensure that salaries are competitive within the industry, taking into account location-specific costs of living, as well as offering attractive benefits packages such as health insurance or flexible working arrangements.

How to measure: An employee engagement survey can be tuned to measure satisfaction with pay and benefits. However, you should benchmark your organization against your top talent competition at least once a year.

Metric #3: Fostering Professional Growth Opportunities

Fostering growth opportunities could involve offering formal training programs or mentoring programs to help employees develop their skills and knowledge within their roles. Additionally, employers should look for ways to offer career advancement opportunities such as promotions or cross-functional projects which help to keep employees engaged with their work while also providing them with new challenges.

How to measure: Develop a career path for employees and communicate development resources at a regular cadence. Your employee engagement survey can tell you if employees feel they have enough professional growth opportunities in your organization.

Create an Engaging Culture

Engaging cultures encourage collaboration between team members both within departments and across different teams. This could involve implementing regular relationship-building opportunities. Such activities can help create a sense of unity amongst colleagues which will ultimately lead to increased job satisfaction and productivity levels. Culture goes far beyond team building, though, and completes the sentence, “The way we work around here is…” If the completion of that sentence does not align with your company’s mission and vision, you have some cultural work to do.

How to measure: Your employee engagement survey can be tuned to measure the expression of your culture again your organization’s mission, vision, and values. You can also measure if your culture is producing a climate that is anabolic (positive emotions) or catabolic (negative emotions).

Utilize Technology for Collaboration

Utilizing technology can enhance collaboration and communication between teams. Utilizing video conferencing software, project management tools such as Trello or Asana, or cloud-based file-sharing services such as Google Drive can all help streamline processes by making it easier for teams to collaborate on projects remotely without having face-to-face meetings every time there’s an issue that needs resolving.

How to measure: The employee engagement survey can measure comfort, discomfort, and utilization or non-utilization of software. However, you should also conduct a technology audit to assure adoption across purchased systems. A gap analysis between desired and actual usage can help

Create Retention Incentives

Companies should strive to reward long-term staff members who have consistently provided value by offering raises or bonuses whenever possible to show appreciation for their hard work over the years. Furthermore, employers should aim to provide flexible working arrangements including telecommuting options so that they can accommodate changing life circumstances among staff members whilst still ensuring that they remain productive throughout any period of transition in their personal lives such as parenthood or caregiving duties for elderly relatives, and so on.

How to measure: The impact of a retention incentive can only be measured with a pilot test. A qualified consultant can help you take the pre-metrics and post-metrics of the test as well as help you with a cost-benefit analysis of a retention incentive policy.

Conclusion

By considering these six key metrics when planning employee retention strategies in industries with high turnover rates, employers can set themselves up for success in driving employee satisfaction levels above average levels across the sector whilst also reducing turnover rates over time thus providing long-term stability within their organization’s workforce structure overall.

Additional Strategies include:

  1. Ensuring all staff members feel valued within the workplace environment
  2. Instituting positive reinforcement measures such as appreciation events or monetary rewards
  3. Encouraging collaboration at all levels
  4. Implementing effective communication tools
  5. Offering competitive wages and benefits
  6. Providing ongoing training & development opportunities
  7. Exploring alternative work arrangements

By doing this, employers will be able not only to retain current staff members but also to create highly satisfied ones too! If you need help with this, go to www.whatworksconsultants.com and schedule a FREE CONSULTATION. We would love to help you engage and satisfy your teams.

Preparing Your Organization for The Great Retirement: Optimizing Employee Retention Across Generations
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The Great Retirement is here. As Baby Boomers retire in droves, HR executives are now tasked with navigating the complex task of optimizing employee retention across multiple generations. With the rise of the gig economy and an ever-changing job market, younger workers have new expectations when it comes to work styles and employer loyalty. This poses a challenge for organizations hoping to retain key talent, let alone attract new ones. In this blog post, we’ll explore how your organization can prepare for The Great Retirement by retaining your employees, taking a look at the work styles of different generations and how to best retain them.

What is The Great Retirement?

The Great Retirement is the phenomenon of Baby Boomers—the generation born between 1946 and 1964—who are aging out of the workforce. With this shift comes a change in the available talent pool, as well as an increase in competition to attract and retain top talent.

How Does It Impact Employee Retention?

This has made employee retention a top priority for HR executives, who must find ways to keep their best employees happy and engaged while meeting their organization’s needs. Organizations must find ways to maintain or improve employee satisfaction in the Boomer generation while keeping an eye on generation-centric retention strategies.

Engaging Baby Boomers

Baby Boomers are approaching retirement age but still have much to offer businesses that seek their wisdom and experience.

Organizations should focus on helping Boomers feel RESPECTED.

  • Flexibility by allowing them to choose shifts that fit into their lifestyle or offering part-time positions so they can transition out of full-time roles gradually if desired
  • Mentorship opportunities, since many enjoy teaching others what they know best—especially if it involves passing down knowledge from one generation of workers to another!

By leveraging this wealth of knowledge while showing appreciation for Baby Boomer contributions, organizations can keep these experienced professionals engaged even as they near retirement age.

Leveraging Gen X Talent

Gen Xers (born 1965-1980) tend to be more independent than other generations which can make them difficult to motivate at times. They also often feel overlooked in favor of younger generations who have more fresh ideas or up-to-date skillsets.

To better leverage Gen X talent, they must feel CHALLENGED.

  • Focus on providing autonomy while still offering support when needed
  • Recognize Gen Xers’ experience and achievements by giving them responsibility within your organization
  • Challenging them with exciting projects that will push them out of their comfort zone
  • Offering competitive salaries with incentives like bonus rewards

Retaining Millennial Employees

Millennials (born between 1981-1996) are now the largest generation in the workforce and have different expectations when it comes to employment than previous generations. They prioritize work-life balance, meaningful work, recognition from their employer, flexible working hours and other perks that go beyond just salary or benefits packages.

To effectively recruit and retain millennial employees, they must feel STIMULATED.

  • Focus on creating an engaging work environment
  • Provide opportunities for growth and development
  • Deliver feedback frequently and with empathy

Maintaining Successful Intergenerational Teamwork

Organizations today must be able to accommodate different generations working together in order to stay competitive in a changing job market—which is why technologies that enable collaboration across generational lines are key! Utilizing video conferencing tools or virtual training programs can help bridge gaps between workers who have different approaches due to varying levels of experience or technological prowess. Additionally, understanding generational differences is an important way of ensuring team members from all walks of life feel respected within your organization’s culture—and leveraging each group’s unique talents can create powerful results when managed correctly!

Need Help?

Need help understanding your intergenerational workforce? Our customized intergenerational engagement study might be the right fit for your organization. Go to www.whatworksconsultants.com and click on FREE CONSULTATION to learn more about how we can help your organization.

How to Create a High-Performing Healthcare Organization: Strategies for Improving Employee Experience and Job Satisfaction
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As healthcare organizations continue to face changing market forces, the ability to attract and retain talented employees is essential for success. In today’s highly competitive environment, it is no longer enough for executives to focus solely on performance metrics. Instead, they must be proactive about fostering an environment where employees feel valued and engaged. This article will explore key strategies small healthcare organizations can use to improve employee experience and job satisfaction, helping them create a high-performing organization.

#1: Create the Right Culture & Values

Every organization’s success is dependent on its culture and values, which are the foundations of how people interact with each other and carry out their work. It is important for small healthcare organizations to create an environment that reflects their core values and promotes job satisfaction. This can be done by encouraging open communication between management, staff, patients, and providers, as well as providing opportunities for employees to give feedback or voice ideas on ways to improve operations. Additionally, it is important to recognize achievement and reward success in order to motivate team members to do their best work every day.

#2: Encourage Effective Communication & Collaboration

Employees need to feel like they are part of a team in order to foster collaboration and promote a sense of company loyalty. To ensure effective communication within the organization, management should place a priority on creating an environment where different perspectives are valued and respected. Holding regular meetings with staff members can help ensure everyone is up-to-date on projects and provide them with a forum for sharing opinions/ideas. Implementing an open-door policy can also encourage employees to share their thoughts directly with management without hesitation. Along with these strategies, it is important for executives to regularly communicate company goals/vision so that everyone understands how they contribute towards achieving them.

#3: Provide Training & Development Opportunities

Any organization looking to stay competitive in today’s market must invest in learning opportunities for employees. By providing training courses or workshops on relevant topics, small healthcare organizations can help enhance employee engagement, productivity and morale while preparing staff members for future challenges within the workplace. Not only does this give employees the chance to grow professionally but it reinforces the commitment from leadership towards developing their staff; something that goes a long way in creating satisfied workers who remain loyal over time.

#4: Establish Employee Recognition Programs

Recognizing employees for their hard work helps build morale, improves motivation levels and reinforces positive behavior within the organization. Small healthcare organizations should consider implementing recognition programs such as awards/incentives or praise delivered publicly or privately depending on the individual preferences of each employee. Other simple forms of recognition include sending out personalized thank you cards or hosting events/activities outside of work time where team members have the chance to connect socially while still getting credit for their contributions at work.

#5: Exploring Flexible Working Arrangements

The demands placed upon healthcare professionals have grown significantly over recent years making flexible working arrangements increasingly attractive; particularly among younger generations entering the workforce. For instance, allowing telecommuting options or adjusting hours when needed throughout the year could support a positive employee experience while still ensuring high-performance results from all team members.

In summary, there are several strategies small healthcare organizations can use to improve employee experience within their workplaces.

1) Create a culture that reflects core values

2) Establish effective communication channels

3) Invest in learning opportunities

4) Implement recognition programs

5) Explore flexible working options

All of these steps combined will help leaders create a high-performing organization with satisfied team members.

ABOUT WHAT WORKS CONSULTANTS

What Works Consultants helps organizations committed to the health of their communities create productive organizations. We help executives with internal research, process improvement, and internal communications, leveraging the power of people operations to create positive outcomes. www.whatworksconsultants.com

TrendSpotting: Research as a Department
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Big Idea Shaping the Workplace of 2030: Adding a Research Department to Increase Utilization of Insights

The trendspotters at WWC see Research as department that Human Resources, Operations, and Marketing can go to for insights. This department will save companies money by decreasing guesswork. This is especially important when executing change within an organization. The research department would provide an objective third-party look at data. It would also provide reports to key departments to inform decision-making.

Why Research is Important for Organizations

Empathetic change management is the wave of the future. We believe that positive organizational change will only be made possible when change agents recognize the impact of internal research, process, internal communication, and people operations.

When companies execute change without objective insights it can result in costly missteps that could have been avoided by asking a few critical questions. This creates data-driven organizations responding to real-world insights, attitudes, and emotions. Change is more likely to stick when it is executed empathetically. Executing empathetic changes makes dollars and sense.

The Alternative: Utilizing Consulting Firms for Research

Companies will increase their usage of small consulting firms in the absence of a research department providing an objective source of data. This will help them understand their internal state to make vital business decisions.

Testing a change idea? Think you might need to research internal or external stakeholders before you innovate? Are you thinking of starting a research department? Dip your toe in the water before going all in. Connect with our Chief Management Consultant, Diane Dye Hansen, for 30 minutes to assess your research needs related to the change you are executing.

Mindset: 7 Positive Messages Provided By Procrastination
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Do you procrastinate?

I can’t tell you how many times I have met with clients who initially resist telling me they procrastinate. They see procrastination as a poor leadership quality, something to train out of. I offer another explanation to my consulting clients. Set judgement aside and consider your procrastination may carry a message for you. Here are seven positive messages I have identified when analyzing my leadership coaching clients procrastination habits.

You are operating outside of your strengths.

When you operate within your strengths, you get brilliant genius energy. Genius energy activities propel you forward. For me, when I am in my genius energy, I am in strategy mode. I’m instructing a client on communication strategy or working in the background putting strategy together. I am looking at communications, scanning for inconsistency, and making words sing like music. When I am in my genius energy, I am building shared vision in teams. I’m watching it click for them. Whether it’s my team or one of my clients, seeing a team “get it” lights me on fire. When I am activating, making things happen, I am really in my zone. I can keep plates spinning knowing that the cooks are cooking up something delicious to go on them. I make things happen, for myself and for my clients. If I am stuck too long in strategy, I get listless. I like things to move! If they aren’t moving, I get out the scissors and I start cutting red tape. I pull out my personal bulldozer and plow through road blocks.

What’s outside of my genius energy? Sales. I can network once I have a personal connection, but I always go personal first and its a SLOW boil. Even then, procrastination kicks in, as does the SHOULD monster. I SHOULD be handling my own sales, right? Not necessarily. That’s why I’ve decided to bring on a sales team. By removing myself from the “doing” of the sales function and into a leadership role, I will empower my firm to grow.

Where are you operating outside your strengths? Where could you supplement that with team or vendor services?

You are operating outside of your passions.

Have you ever just felt that slog of, “I just don’t want to do it?” I think we all have. When you are jumping out of your shoes to do something, odds are you are passionate about it.

It’s kind of like this blog post for me. I just HAD to write it. And, once I started writing it, it just wrote itself. Writing is not my constant passion, however. Inspiration is necessary for me to write. I would not call writing a passion. Communicating is more of a passion for me. Communication strategy, coaching, teaching, consulting – maybe not the nuts and bolts production of it. But, when I get inspired to teach, I teach. Sometimes, passion and talent can get confused. When I get going, writing is a strength of mine. But, put me in a cubicle and tell me to write all day long. Suddenly, that inspired teacher becomes a factory worker. The flow stops because it’s not my passion.

So what’s one to do? Things need to get done, right? Blogs need to be written. If you can’t afford to grow a team to work only in your passions, give your other tasks a sand box to play in. Set boundaries with it and allow yourself to produce more, but not less. I commit to writing one blog a week because I know this blog might pique your interest about my firm. And I know, as the firm grows, I can teach someone to be my voice and to grow the content marketing, inbound marketing, piece of it. Good sandboxes keep procrastination sand from spilling out and ruining the playground of your business.

What non or quasi passions can you set a sandbox around? How can you play and get things done without getting stuck and sacrificing your precious energy?

You are depriving yourself of fun.

Inside of us, we all have a pleasure-seeking, borderline hedonistic, 7 year old. This id driven archetype wants what they want, when they want it. This inner kid is the reason we turn on the TV, reach for Facebook or other social media, allow co-workers to drone on a little too long in the middle of the day, and stretch the limits on our work boundaries. It’s kind of like going on a diet. If you went on a diet that said, NO CHOCOLATE CAKE, what do you want? You might find yourself really wanting chocolate cake, even if it wasn’t your favorite to begin with. Why? It’s because you told your inner 7 year old you couldn’t have it.

Instead, try this. Don’t time your work, allow your fun and time your fun. Always be working toward your fun. Award your focus with a big proverbial lollipop of whatever you like to do for your 7 year old.

Are you guilty of inner child neglect? What ways could you fix that this week to increase your productivity?

You need to allow a break to inspire you.

Sometimes, you just need a break to gain fresh perspective. I travel a lot and, sometimes, I find myself working at coffee shops or co-working spaces. Two sometimes three times a work session, I will shift my location for a literal change in perspective. A couch versus a table is a good choice for me to work at. This allows me to put my computer down, lounge, and observe my surroundings for a bit. Sometimes this isn’t possible in a corporate environment. But you would be amazed how feasible it might be. Reserve a conference room. Work with a co-worker in their space for a bit. Take a pad of paper to the lunch room. Or, just move to a different area of your office. A break in routine disrupts your thought patterns just enough to jog inspiration loose.

Question to ask: How can you shake up your day to day to leave room for inspiration?

You need a physical break.

Bodies are not meant to sit in the same position for long periods of time. It’s the logic behind the standing desk trend. We don’t stand exactly the same way, in the same space, for long. If we do, muscle fatigue will set in fast. Standing desks encourage movement, collaboration, and variety. Now, I’m a sitter. I always have been and I always will be. I am not advocating you run out and buy a standing desk. What I am saying is, shaking it up is good for your body. It’s good to move. As much as moving around my work space helps my inspiration, it also helps my joints. I’m not as stiff. I’m also more energized when I get up. I’ll throw in a little stretch sometimes to.

What can you do to give yourself a physical break?

You need a mental break.

Last, but never least is your mind. Procrastination seeps in when your mind is just simply tired. Stop slave driving your mind. Genius doesn’t come from overwork. Generally what you get is exhaustion, overwhelm, discontent, and a general distaste for what you are working on – no matter how much you love it. Good self communication comes from understanding when you need a mental break. You might notice this from yawning (your body and mind asking for oxygen). When you need a mental break, you may tend to breathe shallow. Shallow breathing increases anxiety. It’s also exhausting. Set your work to the side and take three diaphragmatic breaths.

Do you feel better about procrastinating now?

Next time you do it, stop and listen to what the procrastination is communicating. You can use it as a productivity hack to increase your energy, effectiveness, and awesomeness at anything you do.

Need help as a leader or with your team? Contact us!

Teamwork and brainstorming concept with businessmen seated around a table each pointing to cards with colorful sketches of light bulbs conceptual of bright ideas and solutions arranged in a circle.
Collaboration: Building Shared Vision in Your Organization
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Teamwork and brainstorming concept with businessmen seated around a table each pointing to cards with colorful sketches of light bulbs conceptual of bright ideas and solutions arranged in a circle.It can sound a little harsh, but it’s true. We live in a “what’s in it for me” society. This mindset is at the core of benefits marketing, where marketers need to be very conscious (and communicative) about what the benefit of their product or service is to their target market. However, what some leaders can overlook is how they can apply benefits marketing concepts inside the organization to create shared vision and, as a result, forward momentum.

Shared vision = shared results.

When a leader can build shared vision and specific benefits around a project goal, the buy in increases productivity, momentum, and passion behind the project. In essence, it gets done easier, faster, and better because people see why the project matters to them.

This was highlighted in one of our recent projects in state government. A grant directive was passed down with a short timeline. Although the grant was provided, no succession plan was in place for this great bit of public health communication that was being developed. What Works Consultants worked with the interested internal stakeholders to determine who needed to be involved. More than that, we researched what mattered to each of these stakeholders to develop benefits-driven shared vision for the project. The result: Everyone sees “whats in it for me” and they are bought into the project.

Are there places in your organization where your projects are stuck? Maybe they don’t move as quickly because they lack shared vision.

Here are some quick tips to develop shared vision and get things flowing.

  1. Have a meeting of the minds: Take the time to sit down and discuss the challenges, aspirations, and goals of the people who you would like buy in from. This will show you “what’s in it for them” in regard to your project.
  2. Assess their position: Will they be involved, kept informed, uninvolved, or perhaps they are a supporter who can provide ideas and open doors?
  3. Enlist in their role: Once you see their role, gain buy in on time commitment and responsibilities. Set process around how they prefer to be communicated to and commit to fulfilling your communication promise.

Building shared vision can lead to great collaboration. Do you need help doing this within your organization? Set an appointment to connect with us!

 

Project Management Tips
Project Management: Are you biting off more than you can chew?
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You have a grand idea, product, service, event, or project to pull off. Everyone is excited. You have a project to manage. But there’s a problem. Project management has always created problems for you. How can you assure you are not biting off more than you can chew? How do you set yourself up for success by making a project manageable to begin with?

  1. Tent Pole Project: This is the big project. It usually has a firm deadline or drop dead date associated with it. There is some sort of clear consequence tied to not meeting this date. The date is firm and is usually controlled by something outside of yourself (even if that something is just a pressure to get it done).
  2. Sub Project: These are time sensitive projects that exist within the tent pole project. They might be a little more movable in deadline than the tent pole project itself. However, too much movement on a sub project and the outcome of the tent pole project can be put at risk. Example: You are attending an event, but you need to reorder your business cards because you are out.
  3. Milestone: Tent Pole Projects can be milestones if they are under a larger tent. For example, I have a client who is speaking at a TedX Event. This event is one project inside a larger tent pole of a direct to consumer toy industry product launch. The TedX Event is a milestone for her. The development of her web site as well as the manufacturing of the product are also milestones until this major tent pole project of the direct to consumer campaign.

Project Management Tips

Then, you need to get real.

Where leaders get hung up on this in the perception of time and what can be realistically achieved in a time frame. This is where it helps to have a clear handle on start dates, completion dates, project types, costs, and responsible parties. Business will do its thing and interfere with your projects. Knowing where you are in your timeline will help you manage expectations and set yourself up for success as your project moves along.

Need help?

Do you need project clarity? Do you feel stuck? We may be a fit for you. Depending on the size of your project, one consulting hour with us could save you millions. Contact us to receive a 30 minute complimentary consultation to see if we can help.

What Works Consultants, Inc is a Nevada Emerging Small Business
News: What Works Consultants, Inc is an Emerging Small Business in Nevada
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What Works Consultants, Inc and dba What Works Coaching Receives Tier 1 Emerging Small Business Certification in the State of Nevada

[July 16, 2018 – Carson City, NV] FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – Today, What Works Consultants, Inc. is proud to announce it has received Tier 1 Emerging Small Business Certification from the Nevada Governor’s Office of Economic Development. This certification will assist What Works Consultants, Inc. as it continues to work with municipal, county, and state government in Nevada in the areas of Management and Consulting Services (NAICS 54161), Human Resources Consulting Services (NAICS 541611), Marketing Consulting Services (NAICS 541613), and Other Management Consulting Services (NAICS 541618).

The Emerging Small Business (ESB) Program is a new initiative within the Nevada Governor’s Office of Economic Development which encourages state and local agencies to do business with small businesses to help them grow and thrive. ESB certification allows small businesses to stand out in the government contracting process.

“Municipal, county and state government have been a cornerstone of our work since our first contract with the Division of Public and Behavioral Health in 2013,” says Diane Dye Hansen, president of What Works Consultants, Inc. “We are honored to participate in this program and are looking forward to using our expertise in management, communication, marketing, and human resources to support Nevadans.”

ABOUT WHAT WORKS CONSULTANTS, INC.

What Works Consultants, Inc. helps government and non-profit organizations understand their stakeholders and communicate to them in a strategic and meaningful way. We do this through research, strategic communication planning, change management consulting, human resources recruitment, and training. We are process-driven as well as personalized in our approach. We specialize in customized solutions that work within the specific environment, by-laws, and policies of our client organizations. As an outcome focused firm, we look at what is possible versus what is impossible in difficult to navigate situations and work with your leadership and teams to help achieve it. What Works Consultants, Inc is the only firm in the nation to coach and consult using Critical Opportunity Theory, a proprietary process which defines the symptoms of organizational decline and trains organizations how to question those symptoms to systematically create opportunity from problem situations. The company is located in Carson City, Nevada and has consultants in California and Idaho. Visit the company online at www.whatworksconsultants.com

PRESS CONTACT:

Diane Dye Hansen, President and Founder, What Works Consultants, Inc.
diane@whatworksconsultants.com, 833-546-7228 ext: 1